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Gene Decode! Abandoned Underground Megaprojects. B2T Show Nov 30, 2020 (IS)

Show Notes

Blessed to Teach (B2T) empowers Christian Patriots with Truth!

Gene is feeling better and delivers a Gene Decode around Underground Megaprojects!

Gene gives us insights to what really is happening with many of these abandoned projects.

After we review the entire decode, we review news on the Arizona hearing on voter fraud and Gene gives us some insight on the Kraken!

We end with 2 verses from the Psalms about how good God is and how you can get the desires of your heart from him!

Gene Decode ‚Äď Assembled by Coordinator

ABANDONED UNDERGROUND MEGAPROJECTS

Link : lovemoney.com

Hollywood Subway, total cost adjusted for inflation: $58 million (£44.2m)

Dubbed the Hollywood Subway, LA’s first underground railway line opened in 1925 to much fanfare. Part of the privately owned Pacific Electric Railway, which at the time was the world’s largest electric interurban railway, the near mile-long tunnel connected Beverly and Glendale Boulevards in Westlake with downtown, and was built at a cost of $4 million, the equivalent of $58 million (¬£44.2m) in today’s money.

Hollywood Subway, total cost adjusted for inflation: $58 million (£44.2m)

Passenger numbers peaked during the Second World War but plummeted as LA sprawled out and commuters increasingly turned to cars. The last train pulled out of the tunnel in 1955. While parts were filled in, other sections were used as a disaster shelter and film set, and became a magnet for the homeless, graffiti artists and urban explorers. These sections have since been sealed off and the main terminal building is now a luxury condo development.

Dupont Circle trolley station and tunnels, total cost adjusted for inflation: $64 million (£49m)

This sizeable underground station and tunnels, which stretch for around half a mile, are located under Washington DC’s Dupont Circle. Designed for the capital’s streetcars, the station and tunnels cost $6 million and were built using the cut and cover method. Predating the DC Metro by several decades, they opened in 1949.

Dupont Circle trolley station and tunnels, total cost adjusted for inflation: $64 million (£49m)

Like LA’s Hollywood Subway, the Dupont Circle trolley station and tunnel fell victim to the rise of car culture and closed in the early 1960s when the streetcars were phased out. Parts of the tunnels were repurposed as a fallout shelter but sealed off in 1975. The tunnels were reopened to the public in 2016 and the station has since been transformed into an¬†art gallery and exhibition space.

Camp Century, total cost adjusted for inflation: $69 million (£53m)

This covert nuclear-powered research facility was constructed by the US military between 1959 and 1960 deep under the Greenland ice cap. Ostensibly a base for scientific research, the facility was actually part of the top-secret Project Iceworm and was designed to store nukes and launch nuclear missiles against the USSR in the event of an all-out conflict.

Camp Century, total cost adjusted for inflation: $69 million (£53m)

The project cost $7.9 million, around $69 million (£53m) in 2020 dollars, and consisted of 21 tunnels spanning 1.9 miles. It was abandoned in 1966 after Denmark protested and experts realised the ice cap was less stable than they original believed. Tons of toxic waste remain at the site, which worryingly, is moving ever closer to the edge of the ice cap.

Cincinnati Subway, total cost adjusted for inflation: $305 million (£232m)

Most citizens of¬†Cincinnati have no idea an entire subway system exists beneath the city’s streets. America’s most extensive abandoned metro, the Cincinnati Subway was a colossal failure. Construction commenced in earnest in the early 1900s. Just over two miles of tunnels were built along with four stations before rapidly escalating costs forced the authorities to pull the plug in 1924.

Cincinnati Subway, total cost adjusted for inflation: $305 million (£232m)

The doomed megaproject is estimated to have set back the City of Cincinnati $13 million, which is the equivalent of $305 million (¬£232m) in today’s money. Various proposals to reuse the tunnels and below-ground stations have been floated over the years but none have come to fruition, and the subway, which is now a haunt for the homeless and urban explorers, remains derelict.

Block 37 Superstation, total cost adjusted for inflation: $431 million (£328m)

The City of Chicago has been accused of literally burying piles of taxpayer’s cash after it ploughed $400 million into the Block 37 CTA Superstation in the heart of downtown. Incredibly, the city pressed ahead and constructed the station despite having no guarantee that the service the enormous station was intended for, a futuristic airport link¬†proposed¬†by Elon Musk’s The Boring Company, was feasible.

Block 37 Superstation, total cost adjusted for inflation: $431 million (£328m)

Work began on the superstation, which would have been the downtown terminal for express trains from O’Hare International Airport, back in 2005. It soon became apparent though that the express service wouldn’t come to pass and the city halted building work in 2011. The superstation remains unfinished. In total the disastrous megaproject is slated to have cost taxpayers $400 million in 2015 dollars, the equivalent of¬†$431 million (¬£328m) in 2020.

816 Nuclear Military Plant, total cost adjusted for inflation: $883 million (£673m)

Lurking beneath China’s Sichuan mountains is the largest artificial tunnel and cave structure on the planet. Built by tens of thousands of workers who toiled away in horrendous conditions, the vast network of tunnels span almost 14 miles and the largest cave, which is one of 18, measures more than a million square feet. All in all, the subterranean complex boasts 13 levels.

816 Nuclear Military Plant, total cost adjusted for inflation: $883 million (£673m)

Costing $359 million, the top-secret structure was commissioned by the Chinese government when Cold War tensions were at their peak during the 1960s. The facility housed a nuclear plant capable of producing weapons-grade plutonium. When the Cold War warmed in the early 1980s, the project, which was only 85% completed, was cancelled and today the abandoned complex serves a thriving tourist attraction. The cost of the megaproject would cost¬†$883 million (¬£673m) in today’s money.

Project Riese, total cost adjusted for inflation: $887 million (£677m)

With the Second¬†World War turning heavily in favour of the Allies, the Nazis set about building a gargantuan underground city in April 1943. Shrouded in secrecy, Project Riese (‘riese’ is the German word for giant) involved the construction of seven underground structures connected by 5.5 miles of tunnels under the Owl Mountains in modern-day Poland.

Project Riese, total cost adjusted for inflation: $887 million (£677m)

Thousands of prisoners of war including children were forced to work on the mysterious megaproject and many died in the process. Construction continued until May 1945 when construction, which is estimated to have cost $60 million at the time, abruptly ceased. To this day the exact purpose of Project Riese is unknown but some historians have speculated that the subterranean city could have been built as a bunker for Hitler, or to accommodate a military base.

Balaklava Underground Submarine Base 825 GTS, total cost adjusted for inflation: $1.3 billion (£992m)

Another top-secret Cold War-era military facility, the Balaklava Underground Submarines Base 825 GTS was built by the Soviets under rock 400-feet deep near Sevastopol in Crimea from 1957 to 1961. The final construction bill and cost of equipment and life support systems totalled the equivalent of $1.3 billion (£992m) in 2020 dollars

Balaklava Underground Submarine Base 825 GTS, total cost adjusted for inflation: $1.3 billion (£992m)

Tough enough to withstand a direct hit from a 100-kiloton nuclear bomb, the base was used to service the Soviet Black Sea Fleet. It was abandoned in 1993 following the fall of communism and looted throughout much of the 1990s and early 2000s before its rebirth in 2003 as the Balaklava Naval Museum.

Maginot Line, total cost adjusted for inflation: $3.7 billion (£2.8bn)

Named after the French Minister of War at the time André Maginot, the Maginot Line is a series of semi-subterranean concrete border fortresses connected by underground railway tunnels that were constructed during the 1930s to provide a permanent defence against a German invasion. The French government spent 3 billion francs on building it, the equivalent of $3.7 billion (£2.8bn) today.

Maginot Line, total cost adjusted for inflation: $3.7 billion (£2.8bn)

There was just one very major catch. While the border with Luxembourg, Germany, Switzerland and Italy was robustly defended, the frontier with Belgium had little if any protection. The Nazis exploited this weakness and invaded France in May 1940 via the Franco-Belgian border. The Maginot Line was manned once again after the Second World War, but it was rendered obsolete during the Cold War and effectively abandoned in the 1960s.

Olavsvern, total cost adjusted for inflation: $3.8 billion (£2.8bn)

Carved into a mountain, this covert naval base near Troms√ł was built by the Norwegian Navy in the late 1960s at a cost of $494 million, which is about $3.8 billion (¬£2.8bn) in today’s money. No expense was spared on the base, which was equipped with the most advanced and sophisticated technology money could buy, and featured a plethora of tunnels and rooms beneath the mountain. It took 30 years to build.

Olavsvern, total cost adjusted for inflation: $3.8 billion (£2.8bn)

The Bond villain-esque facility acted as the main service base for NATO submarines operating in the Norwegian and Barents Seas. But Olavsvern lost its key strategic importance following the fall of communism and was deactivated in 2002, before its eventual¬†closure¬†in 2008. In an unusual move the base was put up for sale on a Norwegian auction¬†website and was sold at a knockdown price in 2011 to a consortium of Norwegian oil companies.¬†Much to the Norwegian government and NATO’s chagrin, the base has since been rented by affiliates of the Kremlin-linked Russian energy giant Gazprom.

Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), total cost adjusted for inflation: $4.3 billion (£3.3bn)

Nicknamed the Deserton, the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) in Texas would have been America’s very own particle collider, rivalling the famous particle collider at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. If it had been completely built, the SSC may well have beaten CERN to discover the Higgs boson ‘God particle’.

Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), total cost adjusted for inflation: $4.3 billion (£3.3bn)

The SSC was first proposed in 1976 and construction began in the late 1980s. By the early 1990s, costs were spiralling out of control. The powers that be questioned the viability of the project and whether it was worth the monstrous expense. Needless to say, the shockingly over-budget SSC was cancelled in 1993. By this time, the cost of the megaproject had skyrocketed to $2.4 billion, the equivalent of $4.3 billion (£3.3bn) today, which is quite a cost for an empty underground tunnel in Texas.

PlokŇ°tinńó Missile Base, total cost adjusted for inflation: billions of dollars

Yet another top-secret Cold War-era military facility, PlokŇ°tinńó Missile Base was built by the Soviets from 1960 to 1962 near Lake Plateliai in what is now Lithuania. The construction bill for the mostly underground base was huge, equivalent to the cost of building a small town, so billions in today’s money.

PlokŇ°tinńó Missile Base, total cost adjusted for inflation: billions of dollars

Consisting of several deep shafts, a number of missile silos and a maze of tunnels, the installation contained numerous nuclear missiles and was large enough to house hundreds of personnel. The base was decommissioned in 1978 and was a magnet for trespassers until 2012 when it underwent restoration and was converted into the a museum devoted to the Cold War.

Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, total cost adjusted for inflation: $6 billion (£4.6bn)

A bewildering waste of taxpayers’ money, the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Nekoma, North Dakota was completed in April 1975 at a cost of $6 billion (¬£4.6bn) when adjusted for 2020 dollars. The cutting-edge complex, which was was built beneath and around an eye-catching pyramid structure, provided launch and control for scores of short and longer-range anti-ballistic missiles.

Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, total cost adjusted for inflation: $6 billion (£4.6bn)

Unbelievably, the multibillion-dollar state of the art facility was fully operational for just 24 hours. In October 1975 Congress deemed the base ineffective, pulled funding and voted to decommission the whole shebang, literally a day after it went from initial to full operating capacity. The base was eventually sold for peanuts in 2012 to a religious group.

Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, total cost adjusted for inflation: $17.1 billion (£13bn)

Yucca Mountain in Nevada was chosen in 1987 to be America’s principal nuclear waste repository. The underground facility was eventually approved by Congress in 2002, and construction work began not long after. The megaproject met with intense opposition and a number of problems arose, from the unsuitable geology of the site to concerns about transporting waste.

Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, total cost adjusted for inflation: $17.1 billion (£13bn)

When it was confirmed that nuclear power stations could store waste on site safely over decades, politicians began to wonder if the project was even necessary. President Obama pulled federal funding in 2011 and effectively canned the project. By then around $15 billion had been invested, the equivalent of $17.1 billion (¬£13bn) in today’s money. With no real plans afoot to revive the project, the Yucca Mountain repository remains in limbo.

ŇĹeljava Air Base, total cost adjusted for inflation: $48.7 billion (¬£37.2bn)

ŇĹeljava Air Base was built by the Yugoslav armed forces between the late 1940s and early 1960s under a mountain at a secret location on what is now the border of Bosnia and Croatia. One of Europe’s largest military facilities, the cavernous installation served as a command centre and housed a missile early warning system. It could accommodate up to 1,000 personnel and withstand a direct strike from a 20-kiloton nuclear warhead.

ŇĹeljava Air Base, total cost adjusted for inflation: $48.7 billion (¬£37.2bn)

The base, which is estimated to have cost an astronomical $6 billion at the time, the equivalent of $48.7 billion (¬£37.2bn) today, was operational until the early 1990s. Despite the vast expense, the withdrawing Yugoslav People’s Army destroyed much of the complex during the Yugoslav Wars in 1991 to prevent the opposing forces from using it for their own ends. The complex has remained abandoned ever since.

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Bible Study Verses

Psalm 34:8

Taste and see that the Lord is good;
blessed is the one who takes refuge in him.

Psalm 37:4

Take delight in the Lord,
and he will give you the desires of your heart.

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